instagram:

A Dachshund Collage A Day with @acidinvader

To see more of David Carnie’s whimsical wiener dog works, follow @acidinvader on Instagram.

Before he became a prolific, semi-anonymous creator of dachshund-themed collages, David Carnie’s biggest claim to fame was coining the term “bromance” in the mid-90s. (“I’m sorry,” he says.) For the past year and a half, however, David has produced a dachshund collage nearly every single day under the pseudonym @acidinvader—an anagram of his name.

David began collaging as an exercise in creativity after receiving a daily dachshund calendar as a gift from his parents. “At the time, I had a soul-crushing job that was rendering me mentally bankrupt,” David says, “so I gave myself an assignment: make one piece of art every day for one year.” A year came and went, and he kept collaging.

“I like the random juxtapositions that collages create,” explains David. “That’s part of the ‘exercise’: letting go.” But that doesn’t mean his collages are completely devoid of deeper meaning: “There’s the occasional smarty-pants reference to literature, mythology, fairy tales or music.” instagram:

A Dachshund Collage A Day with @acidinvader

To see more of David Carnie’s whimsical wiener dog works, follow @acidinvader on Instagram.

Before he became a prolific, semi-anonymous creator of dachshund-themed collages, David Carnie’s biggest claim to fame was coining the term “bromance” in the mid-90s. (“I’m sorry,” he says.) For the past year and a half, however, David has produced a dachshund collage nearly every single day under the pseudonym @acidinvader—an anagram of his name.

David began collaging as an exercise in creativity after receiving a daily dachshund calendar as a gift from his parents. “At the time, I had a soul-crushing job that was rendering me mentally bankrupt,” David says, “so I gave myself an assignment: make one piece of art every day for one year.” A year came and went, and he kept collaging.

“I like the random juxtapositions that collages create,” explains David. “That’s part of the ‘exercise’: letting go.” But that doesn’t mean his collages are completely devoid of deeper meaning: “There’s the occasional smarty-pants reference to literature, mythology, fairy tales or music.” instagram:

A Dachshund Collage A Day with @acidinvader

To see more of David Carnie’s whimsical wiener dog works, follow @acidinvader on Instagram.

Before he became a prolific, semi-anonymous creator of dachshund-themed collages, David Carnie’s biggest claim to fame was coining the term “bromance” in the mid-90s. (“I’m sorry,” he says.) For the past year and a half, however, David has produced a dachshund collage nearly every single day under the pseudonym @acidinvader—an anagram of his name.

David began collaging as an exercise in creativity after receiving a daily dachshund calendar as a gift from his parents. “At the time, I had a soul-crushing job that was rendering me mentally bankrupt,” David says, “so I gave myself an assignment: make one piece of art every day for one year.” A year came and went, and he kept collaging.

“I like the random juxtapositions that collages create,” explains David. “That’s part of the ‘exercise’: letting go.” But that doesn’t mean his collages are completely devoid of deeper meaning: “There’s the occasional smarty-pants reference to literature, mythology, fairy tales or music.” instagram:

A Dachshund Collage A Day with @acidinvader

To see more of David Carnie’s whimsical wiener dog works, follow @acidinvader on Instagram.

Before he became a prolific, semi-anonymous creator of dachshund-themed collages, David Carnie’s biggest claim to fame was coining the term “bromance” in the mid-90s. (“I’m sorry,” he says.) For the past year and a half, however, David has produced a dachshund collage nearly every single day under the pseudonym @acidinvader—an anagram of his name.

David began collaging as an exercise in creativity after receiving a daily dachshund calendar as a gift from his parents. “At the time, I had a soul-crushing job that was rendering me mentally bankrupt,” David says, “so I gave myself an assignment: make one piece of art every day for one year.” A year came and went, and he kept collaging.

“I like the random juxtapositions that collages create,” explains David. “That’s part of the ‘exercise’: letting go.” But that doesn’t mean his collages are completely devoid of deeper meaning: “There’s the occasional smarty-pants reference to literature, mythology, fairy tales or music.” instagram:

A Dachshund Collage A Day with @acidinvader

To see more of David Carnie’s whimsical wiener dog works, follow @acidinvader on Instagram.

Before he became a prolific, semi-anonymous creator of dachshund-themed collages, David Carnie’s biggest claim to fame was coining the term “bromance” in the mid-90s. (“I’m sorry,” he says.) For the past year and a half, however, David has produced a dachshund collage nearly every single day under the pseudonym @acidinvader—an anagram of his name.

David began collaging as an exercise in creativity after receiving a daily dachshund calendar as a gift from his parents. “At the time, I had a soul-crushing job that was rendering me mentally bankrupt,” David says, “so I gave myself an assignment: make one piece of art every day for one year.” A year came and went, and he kept collaging.

“I like the random juxtapositions that collages create,” explains David. “That’s part of the ‘exercise’: letting go.” But that doesn’t mean his collages are completely devoid of deeper meaning: “There’s the occasional smarty-pants reference to literature, mythology, fairy tales or music.” instagram:

A Dachshund Collage A Day with @acidinvader

To see more of David Carnie’s whimsical wiener dog works, follow @acidinvader on Instagram.

Before he became a prolific, semi-anonymous creator of dachshund-themed collages, David Carnie’s biggest claim to fame was coining the term “bromance” in the mid-90s. (“I’m sorry,” he says.) For the past year and a half, however, David has produced a dachshund collage nearly every single day under the pseudonym @acidinvader—an anagram of his name.

David began collaging as an exercise in creativity after receiving a daily dachshund calendar as a gift from his parents. “At the time, I had a soul-crushing job that was rendering me mentally bankrupt,” David says, “so I gave myself an assignment: make one piece of art every day for one year.” A year came and went, and he kept collaging.

“I like the random juxtapositions that collages create,” explains David. “That’s part of the ‘exercise’: letting go.” But that doesn’t mean his collages are completely devoid of deeper meaning: “There’s the occasional smarty-pants reference to literature, mythology, fairy tales or music.”

instagram:

A Dachshund Collage A Day with @acidinvader

To see more of David Carnie’s whimsical wiener dog works, follow @acidinvader on Instagram.

Before he became a prolific, semi-anonymous creator of dachshund-themed collages, David Carnie’s biggest claim to fame was coining the term “bromance” in the mid-90s. (“I’m sorry,” he says.) For the past year and a half, however, David has produced a dachshund collage nearly every single day under the pseudonym @acidinvader—an anagram of his name.

David began collaging as an exercise in creativity after receiving a daily dachshund calendar as a gift from his parents. “At the time, I had a soul-crushing job that was rendering me mentally bankrupt,” David says, “so I gave myself an assignment: make one piece of art every day for one year.” A year came and went, and he kept collaging.

“I like the random juxtapositions that collages create,” explains David. “That’s part of the ‘exercise’: letting go.” But that doesn’t mean his collages are completely devoid of deeper meaning: “There’s the occasional smarty-pants reference to literature, mythology, fairy tales or music.”

scienceetfiction:

On IndieGameStand, pay what you want for Infinite Space III: Sea of Stars, early access version, on Steam for Windows (until September 3, see the site for the exact time).  If you pay above the average, you get the two prior games in the series (Weird Worlds and Return to Infinite Space). 
This is a starship roguelike, adventure game of interstellar exploration and combat. The universe is randomly generated each time you play. You choose a ship, explore planets, and randomly find items (for trade or ship improvements), merchants, allies or enemies. The goal is to gain the more money and to go back to your origin planet before a given time.  This is not very complicated, but you can die quickly if you fight enemies too strong for you.  This is made to play for short sessions, between 10 minutes and half an hour. You can’t save your game.   
I already had the second game and I got this one too. This is a beta version, already playable, with more features to come. I tried it and I like it so far. There is a new 3D map, a little more confusing at first, but that creates a nice immersive sci-fi feeling. There is a good variety of races and items.  This is a fun game  to pretend to be a space captain for a moment.
To know more, you can see the Steam page or a game play video.  (The game works well with my old integrated graphic card, so it should work with almost anything, see the Steam page for requirements.)  scienceetfiction:

On IndieGameStand, pay what you want for Infinite Space III: Sea of Stars, early access version, on Steam for Windows (until September 3, see the site for the exact time).  If you pay above the average, you get the two prior games in the series (Weird Worlds and Return to Infinite Space). 
This is a starship roguelike, adventure game of interstellar exploration and combat. The universe is randomly generated each time you play. You choose a ship, explore planets, and randomly find items (for trade or ship improvements), merchants, allies or enemies. The goal is to gain the more money and to go back to your origin planet before a given time.  This is not very complicated, but you can die quickly if you fight enemies too strong for you.  This is made to play for short sessions, between 10 minutes and half an hour. You can’t save your game.   
I already had the second game and I got this one too. This is a beta version, already playable, with more features to come. I tried it and I like it so far. There is a new 3D map, a little more confusing at first, but that creates a nice immersive sci-fi feeling. There is a good variety of races and items.  This is a fun game  to pretend to be a space captain for a moment.
To know more, you can see the Steam page or a game play video.  (The game works well with my old integrated graphic card, so it should work with almost anything, see the Steam page for requirements.)  scienceetfiction:

On IndieGameStand, pay what you want for Infinite Space III: Sea of Stars, early access version, on Steam for Windows (until September 3, see the site for the exact time).  If you pay above the average, you get the two prior games in the series (Weird Worlds and Return to Infinite Space). 
This is a starship roguelike, adventure game of interstellar exploration and combat. The universe is randomly generated each time you play. You choose a ship, explore planets, and randomly find items (for trade or ship improvements), merchants, allies or enemies. The goal is to gain the more money and to go back to your origin planet before a given time.  This is not very complicated, but you can die quickly if you fight enemies too strong for you.  This is made to play for short sessions, between 10 minutes and half an hour. You can’t save your game.   
I already had the second game and I got this one too. This is a beta version, already playable, with more features to come. I tried it and I like it so far. There is a new 3D map, a little more confusing at first, but that creates a nice immersive sci-fi feeling. There is a good variety of races and items.  This is a fun game  to pretend to be a space captain for a moment.
To know more, you can see the Steam page or a game play video.  (The game works well with my old integrated graphic card, so it should work with almost anything, see the Steam page for requirements.)  scienceetfiction:

On IndieGameStand, pay what you want for Infinite Space III: Sea of Stars, early access version, on Steam for Windows (until September 3, see the site for the exact time).  If you pay above the average, you get the two prior games in the series (Weird Worlds and Return to Infinite Space). 
This is a starship roguelike, adventure game of interstellar exploration and combat. The universe is randomly generated each time you play. You choose a ship, explore planets, and randomly find items (for trade or ship improvements), merchants, allies or enemies. The goal is to gain the more money and to go back to your origin planet before a given time.  This is not very complicated, but you can die quickly if you fight enemies too strong for you.  This is made to play for short sessions, between 10 minutes and half an hour. You can’t save your game.   
I already had the second game and I got this one too. This is a beta version, already playable, with more features to come. I tried it and I like it so far. There is a new 3D map, a little more confusing at first, but that creates a nice immersive sci-fi feeling. There is a good variety of races and items.  This is a fun game  to pretend to be a space captain for a moment.
To know more, you can see the Steam page or a game play video.  (The game works well with my old integrated graphic card, so it should work with almost anything, see the Steam page for requirements.) 

scienceetfiction:

On IndieGameStand, pay what you want for Infinite Space III: Sea of Stars, early access version, on Steam for Windows (until September 3, see the site for the exact time).  If you pay above the average, you get the two prior games in the series (Weird Worlds and Return to Infinite Space). 

This is a starship roguelike, adventure game of interstellar exploration and combat. The universe is randomly generated each time you play. You choose a ship, explore planets, and randomly find items (for trade or ship improvements), merchants, allies or enemies. The goal is to gain the more money and to go back to your origin planet before a given time.  This is not very complicated, but you can die quickly if you fight enemies too strong for you.  This is made to play for short sessions, between 10 minutes and half an hour. You can’t save your game.   

I already had the second game and I got this one too. This is a beta version, already playable, with more features to come. I tried it and I like it so far. There is a new 3D map, a little more confusing at first, but that creates a nice immersive sci-fi feeling. There is a good variety of races and items.  This is a fun game  to pretend to be a space captain for a moment.

To know more, you can see the Steam page or a game play video.  (The game works well with my old integrated graphic card, so it should work with almost anything, see the Steam page for requirements.) 

prostheticknowledge:

Punctuate
Creative coding project by Jason Lin can convert text into 3D geometric drawings, turning writing into a visual grammar - video embedded below:


My latest Processing project!
… I came up with this idea because my last project used an excel sheet and received insane amounts of numbers and data. This time I wanted to use a text file and receive insane amounts of words and letters and most importantly, punctuation!
I had seen pictures of “sentence maps” before where a line was created and it got longer with every word and made a turn every time the sentence ended. Colors would change with every character or some other factor.
Basically I wanted to take this idea and make it HUGE. I wanted an entire 3D explore-able environment.
 The video explains what I chose to do for every single type of punctuation mark.



More at Jason’s art blog here
The project hasn’t been made available to the public yet, but at Jason’s Tumblr blog (obeserhino) you can send him suggestions to try out. [Link]

Wow! prostheticknowledge:

Punctuate
Creative coding project by Jason Lin can convert text into 3D geometric drawings, turning writing into a visual grammar - video embedded below:


My latest Processing project!
… I came up with this idea because my last project used an excel sheet and received insane amounts of numbers and data. This time I wanted to use a text file and receive insane amounts of words and letters and most importantly, punctuation!
I had seen pictures of “sentence maps” before where a line was created and it got longer with every word and made a turn every time the sentence ended. Colors would change with every character or some other factor.
Basically I wanted to take this idea and make it HUGE. I wanted an entire 3D explore-able environment.
 The video explains what I chose to do for every single type of punctuation mark.



More at Jason’s art blog here
The project hasn’t been made available to the public yet, but at Jason’s Tumblr blog (obeserhino) you can send him suggestions to try out. [Link]

Wow! prostheticknowledge:

Punctuate
Creative coding project by Jason Lin can convert text into 3D geometric drawings, turning writing into a visual grammar - video embedded below:


My latest Processing project!
… I came up with this idea because my last project used an excel sheet and received insane amounts of numbers and data. This time I wanted to use a text file and receive insane amounts of words and letters and most importantly, punctuation!
I had seen pictures of “sentence maps” before where a line was created and it got longer with every word and made a turn every time the sentence ended. Colors would change with every character or some other factor.
Basically I wanted to take this idea and make it HUGE. I wanted an entire 3D explore-able environment.
 The video explains what I chose to do for every single type of punctuation mark.



More at Jason’s art blog here
The project hasn’t been made available to the public yet, but at Jason’s Tumblr blog (obeserhino) you can send him suggestions to try out. [Link]

Wow!

prostheticknowledge:

Punctuate

Creative coding project by Jason Lin can convert text into 3D geometric drawings, turning writing into a visual grammar - video embedded below:

My latest Processing project!

… I came up with this idea because my last project used an excel sheet and received insane amounts of numbers and data.
This time I wanted to use a text file and receive insane amounts of words and letters and most importantly, punctuation!

I had seen pictures of “sentence maps” before where a line was created and it got longer with every word and made a turn every time the sentence ended. Colors would change with every character or some other factor.

Basically I wanted to take this idea and make it HUGE. I wanted an entire 3D explore-able environment.

The video explains what I chose to do for every single type of punctuation mark.

More at Jason’s art blog here

The project hasn’t been made available to the public yet, but at Jason’s Tumblr blog (obeserhino) you can send him suggestions to try out. [Link]

Wow!

“Champions do not become champions when they win the event, but in the hours, weeks, months and years they spend preparing for it. The victorious performance itself is merely the demonstration of their championship character.”

- T. Alan Armstrong (thinkexist.com)
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